Meatball Tailoring in Practice

 I know that I’ve not been posting very much lately.  A combination of other hobbies, a lack of thrifting, and honestly, a lack of drive to do alterations have collided and resulted in very little in terms of fit pictures or articles.  I haven’t stopped caring about what I wear; I still make sure to dress well, but I just haven’t bought or done much in terms of new material for you all.

As I alluded to Monday, I have been working on a little project to get my creative juices going again.  Just so I don’t get too long winded yet, I’ll just tell you what I did.

 

I made a denim jacket.  Out of a pair of pants.


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Here’s a closeup of the homemade bow tie.  I had been wanting a gray flannel bow tie for a little while, but I found that they were pretty expensive.  At the same time, I found out that a pair of gray flannel pants I bought had way too high of a rise (I’m talking, slightly under my sternum rise).  Serendipity.
I used this guide to make it.  Since I had a bow tie that I liked already, I used that instead of the pattern.  In addition to the fabric, you’ll need non-fusible interfacing.  The guide suggests cutting it out of two old ties, but honestly, a yard of the stuff costs maybe 2 dollars at the craft store so you really won’t be saving money.
It’s a fairly straight forward sewing project.  If you are just going to use one of your old bow ties as a pattern, remember to add about 1/4” allowance all around so it’ll end up the right shape.  Also, a pair of pants could probably net you enough material for 3 bow ties.

Here’s a closeup of the homemade bow tie.  I had been wanting a gray flannel bow tie for a little while, but I found that they were pretty expensive.  At the same time, I found out that a pair of gray flannel pants I bought had way too high of a rise (I’m talking, slightly under my sternum rise).  Serendipity.

I used this guide to make it.  Since I had a bow tie that I liked already, I used that instead of the pattern.  In addition to the fabric, you’ll need non-fusible interfacing.  The guide suggests cutting it out of two old ties, but honestly, a yard of the stuff costs maybe 2 dollars at the craft store so you really won’t be saving money.

It’s a fairly straight forward sewing project.  If you are just going to use one of your old bow ties as a pattern, remember to add about 1/4” allowance all around so it’ll end up the right shape.  Also, a pair of pants could probably net you enough material for 3 bow ties.