Anonymous said: Fittist, I've been reading through your sight, love it, especially the how-to's and I was wondering if you ever used a serger for any of your sewing.

Thank you for the nice words!

I have not used a serger, unfortunately.  It’s actually something I’ve been looking for, but just haven’t run across one yet.  Hopefully one day.

Clothing companies, take note:  If you’re going to call something “the ______ reimagined”, then it should probably be functionally, aesthetically, or even marginally different from every other one on the market.

I’m looking at you, Everlane.

tyronicus said: I need to try taking in the waist on a pair of Uniqlo jeans that I've had for awhile. (They're great, by the way!) I'd love to see a photo of the inside of a pair that you've worked on. Do you basically just fold, stitch, then cut out the "v" of excess fabric on the inside? Thanks. This blog is great.

Yeah…I suck.  I’m sorry that it took me so long to get back to you.

When I take in the waist of jeans, I avoid going straight up the middle, because not only will you lose a belt loop, but you’ll also lose the middle seam and it looks real weird.  Instead, I go above the back pockets, dividing the amount you need to take out by two.  You can see in the picture where I took mine in.

First, make sure you won’t run into your leather patch, if you have one.  Just make your fold to the side.  Second, I really wouldn’t suggest taking out too much fabric.  The more you take out, the deeper the V will be, the further down it goes, and it’ll start to make the back pockets balloon out.  I guess you could fix that with detaching the pockets and reattaching them, but that would be a pain.  

I’d definitely recommend pinning this job first, just to make sure you are happy with how the pockets look.  And make sure to use a denim needle.

Good luck!

Just a quick reader poll:  How many pair of shoes do you have?

Sometimes, you can go months and months without finding anything too great.
And sometimes, you find two pair of Alden tassel loafers on two separate days at two separate stores, both in your size.
(The one on the right I think is shell cordovan)

tangodancingphdcandidate said: The shirts you're describing sound like short sleeved sport shirts, rather than short sleeved dress shirts

Yeah, I was actually thinking about that the whole time I was writing that up.  But I was also wondering how much of a distinction the person who asked the question was putting into it.  I know when I first started, I read the whole “no short sleeve dress shirts” as also including sports shirts.

putthison:

Q & Answer: The Short-Sleeved Dress Shirt
Jon asks: Can a gentleman wear a short sleeve dress shirt to work and still be considered a gentleman? It’s getting hot, so I thought I’d ask. Thanks for any help, Jesse! 
The short-sleeved dress shirt is a bit of a fashion anomaly. It became popular in the 1960s among men who had to wear a dress shirt, but didn’t want to - think engineers and other men in horn-rimmed glasses. Or Michael Douglas in Falling Down. As dress restrictions eased, and the fashion faded, they passed out of vogue for all but their most ardent adherents: Mormon missionaries.
In the past few years, they’ve had a bit of a resurgence as a semi-ironic element of “geek chic.” The new versions are typically worn very slim, without a coat, and often combined with the top-button-buttoned-but-no-tie look. 
Can you wear that kind of thing to work? Well, you know better than I. If you’re looking to dress classically well, the answer’s pretty much no. If a trendy casual look’s what you’re after, you’re probably fine, though the style is on the downward slope there. 
If you’re looking for an alternative, try a shirt in linen or a linen-cotton blend, an open weave, or simply roll up your sleeves. 

I’m actually going to disagree here.
First off, I should say that my office is pretty lax with its dress code.  We can’t wear jeans or t-shirts, but polos are fine.  And I find that the few short sleeve “dress” shirts I have act much more like polo substitutes.
First, I’d never wear a tie or coat with them.  Second, I avoid any shirting that I think is too similar to a “normal” dress shirt.  No solids, no regular stripes.  Instead, I opt for bold fabric and color choices.  I have one that’s made of seersucker, and the one I’m wearing right now is a bold madras print.
Treat them like polos (if your office allows those) and they’ll be fine.

putthison:

Q & Answer: The Short-Sleeved Dress Shirt

Jon asks: Can a gentleman wear a short sleeve dress shirt to work and still be considered a gentleman? It’s getting hot, so I thought I’d ask. Thanks for any help, Jesse!

The short-sleeved dress shirt is a bit of a fashion anomaly. It became popular in the 1960s among men who had to wear a dress shirt, but didn’t want to - think engineers and other men in horn-rimmed glasses. Or Michael Douglas in Falling Down. As dress restrictions eased, and the fashion faded, they passed out of vogue for all but their most ardent adherents: Mormon missionaries.

In the past few years, they’ve had a bit of a resurgence as a semi-ironic element of “geek chic.” The new versions are typically worn very slim, without a coat, and often combined with the top-button-buttoned-but-no-tie look.

Can you wear that kind of thing to work? Well, you know better than I. If you’re looking to dress classically well, the answer’s pretty much no. If a trendy casual look’s what you’re after, you’re probably fine, though the style is on the downward slope there.

If you’re looking for an alternative, try a shirt in linen or a linen-cotton blend, an open weave, or simply roll up your sleeves.

I’m actually going to disagree here.

First off, I should say that my office is pretty lax with its dress code.  We can’t wear jeans or t-shirts, but polos are fine.  And I find that the few short sleeve “dress” shirts I have act much more like polo substitutes.

First, I’d never wear a tie or coat with them.  Second, I avoid any shirting that I think is too similar to a “normal” dress shirt.  No solids, no regular stripes.  Instead, I opt for bold fabric and color choices.  I have one that’s made of seersucker, and the one I’m wearing right now is a bold madras print.

Treat them like polos (if your office allows those) and they’ll be fine.

Back on the grind.

(Lands End Canvas Chambray shirt
Banana Republic blazer
Vintage black knit tie
J. Crew chinos)

Back on the grind.

(Lands End Canvas Chambray shirt
Banana Republic blazer
Vintage black knit tie
J. Crew chinos)